#TBT: Cute Is What We Aim For

ciwwaf-featured-tbt.jpg

I was in my dad’s old ’91 Mustang convertible, driving with my older brother and his best friend when I first heard them.  It was on a mix CD, and it followed an old T.I. song.  I hear the echoing chords of the acoustic guitar in the intro, and then the first lines, “And so typically, and so typically; soft, set back and perfectly dropped, tough and learn, and so perfectly taught.”  Uhh, what? This was the first time I heard Cute Is What We Aim For’s first hit, “Teasing to Please”.  I really didn’t understand those beginning lines at all (and to be honest, still don’t), but it didn’t matter.  I was 13 years old, and, when it seems as though your whole world is falling apart because your crush likes someone else, the song was perfect.  So, eventually the car ride ended up with my older brother’s friend standing up in his seat screaming the chorus at the top of his lungs -- and it was at this moment that I decided I needed to know these guys.

ciwwaf band pic

This might be a stretch here, but I’m willing to venture and say that most of us know of Cute Is What We Aim For, whether we’d like to admit it or not.  (Let’s face it, you probably won’t be hearing “The Curse of Curves” at a downtown party anytime soon, but if you did, you know it’d be awesome!).  And, since that day in the Mustang, almost every road trip/obligatory boyfriend-girlfriend “songs that remind me of you” mix CD I have ever made has included at least one song from these guys.

Cute Is What We Aim For ended up releasing two major albums aside from their original EP: The Same Old Blood Rush With A New Touch and Rotation.  Both albums are the kind of albums you can listen to straight through without skipping a single song: a one-way trip to the beach (totally depends on how far away the beach is from your house) without having to repeat a single track.  Now, in the age of digital media this might not mean much, but when F.Y.E. was still in business and CD players on the bus ride to school were a must, $14 was a lot to spend on an album for only one or two good songs.

ciwwaf the same old.. cover

So, now that I’ve jogged that long-term memory of yours, and hopefully sparked up some fond memories jamming out to one of the greatest bands of our middle school years, enjoy listening to some of my favorites from CIWWAF off of the Spotify playlist below.  Random outbursts of singing and dancing are strongly encouraged.

[Images sourced from musicremedy.com, lisdweb.org, bandaidrecords.com, and sodahead.com]